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How to Write a Resume for a Teenager With No Job Experience

Your First Job Resume: What It Is and Why You Need It

❶You might use bullet points to write what your responsibilities were or what skills you used in these activities. An objective should come in the form of a 2 to 3 line paragraph that states what you want to do professional and why you would be good at it.

Best Resume Format for Teens

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What qualities do your family members mention when they brag about you? What types of things do you do for your family?

What types of things do you do for your friends? What are your best subjects at school? What awards have you won? What honors have you received? Associate Yourself to Resume Goal Demonstrate abilities skills and strengths through specific examples Focus on accomplishments Use action verbs Quantify whenever possible 4.

Resume Development Worksheet 1. What are some of your unique talents strengths and abilities? What are your educational experiences? Once you have written a draft of the resume check off each of these: Include your educational level.

As teens frequently have little experience beyond their high school education, include a section outlining our education on the top of your resume. Start with your most recent school and work your way back. However, you should not go all the way back to elementary school. Just list your college, if you're enrolled, and your high school education. Things like the honors roll, honors college, or Dean's list speak to a strong work ethic.

If you have a particularly high GPA, you might want to list that too. Add work experience creatively. Oftentimes, teens have yet to have a real job or their work experience is very limited. However, there are ways to creatively present work experience in a way that displays a strong skill set even if work experience is limited. List formal or informal volunteer work, babysitting, or any gardening, dog walking, or other chores you may have done for relatives or neighbors for money.

Even if these are not highly formal jobs that require a large skill set, the fact you performed them on a somewhat regular basis speaks to a strong work ethic and good time management skills. Focus on how you talked to and assisted customers and the vast amount of information you had to manage. Use your words wisely.

Make use of resume "buzz words" when you list the jobs you have held. Buzz words are words used on resumes to make work experience appear impressive to help catch an employer's eye. Online, you can find lists of resume buzzwords that will help up your chances of getting the job you want. Things like classified, analyzed, facilitated, collected, assessed, calculated, trained, and designed are just a small example of the kinds of words that look great on a resume.

If you waitress on the weekend in high school, a good bullet point for your job description might be "Interacted politely with multiple customers on a nightly basis, maintaining a positive public image for the business. Employers love it when tasks are quantified. Say you're a junior in high school and spent the summer tutoring middle school students in math. Instead of saying "Tutored students each week," can be worded in a more impressive manner and in a way that quantifies your work.

For example, "Tutored a rotating group of 6 to 7 students on a bi-weekly basis, conveying concepts of basic algebra and geometry in an age-appropriate manner. List any special skills or achievements. While you may be spotty on actual job experience, having a section titled something like "Achievements and Honors" can help you highlight impressive non-work related information. If you've ever won any contests or excelled in an extracurricular activity, this would be a great thing to add in a resume.

Putting emphasis on high grades and good study skills shows that you're a hard worker and would apply yourself to a job if hired.

References are a great thing to include on a resume for a teenager. As experience might be lacking, having a couple of people vouch for your work ethic is vital to setting yourself apart. References should be people who can speak to your skill set. Choose teachers, former bosses, people you've worked with volunteering, coaches, music instructors, or even a family friend who's known you for a long time.

Emphasize your work ethic. If your experience is limited, there are ways to emphasis your work ethic anyway. Employers may be hesitant to hire inexperienced workers, but they may take a chance on you if you appear to be a hard worker. Focus on your academic achievements. If you have not had a lot of practical experience but where a high achiever in terms of grades and test scores, this may impress an employer. Many college or high school courses cover softwares that may be important for certain jobs.

If you're proficient in something like Photoshop or Adobe Illustrator, list that here. Even just having conversational skills in Spanish or French due to high school courses can look good on a resume. Use proper grammar, spelling, and punctuation. A good resume should be free of spelling and grammatical errors. Make sure you proofread carefully.

You should also have someone else read over your resume for you to make sure you caught all the errors. Sometimes, if you're working on a document for a long time you tend to get typo blind and miss obvious errors. Tailor your resume for different jobs. Check out this article for the full scoop on how to write a resume summary. Waiting tables is a pretty common teen job. Waiting tables is also difficult and demanding work. The job requires careful attention to detail, strong listening skills, great customer service skills, and the ability to sell items by making recommendations and pitching specials.

But let your employers know that you plan to do more than the minimum, and keep that in mind when mentioning accomplishments on your resume. Teenagers are lazy and careless on the job. Prove that stereotype wrong by emphasizing a track record of timeliness and traits that suggest reliability and maturity, such as working well with superiors, and working well in a team environment.

Consider including along with your resume one or two prepared letters of recommendation from teachers, coaches, or community leaders that speak about your outstanding qualities and skills. Again, employers want reassurance that you know how to buckle down, make commitments, follow through, and do an awesome job.


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Tips for Writing a Resume for Teenagers. When you are writing a high school resume, it’s important to make sure you include all the pertinent information in an acceptable standard csample.ml want your resume to clearly show the employer what kind of employee you’ll be.

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Here's the good news: You probably have more information to put on your resume than you think. Experiences like babysitting, lawn mowing, and volunteering all help to show valuable work skills that employers want to see.

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Free High School Student Resume Templates for Teens. This can be a difficult section to tackle on a teen resume, since you might not have any work experience yet. Don’t worry though. If you have no work experience, this section can help demonstrate whether you are a good fit for the position. If you start with the job listings instead of with the blank page, the hiring manager's keywords will guide you, and help you focus on which of your academic or after-school experiences have prepared you for this first step in your career. First Resume Example.

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Sep 06,  · A lack of job experience doesn't mean a lack of work experience. If you are a teenager looking for your first payroll job, punch up your resume by focusing on your strengths, whatever they may be. Welcome to Jobs For Teens Headquarters Our website is dedicated to helping teens find jobs. Getting a job is tough, but getting a job when you .