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What Is the Meaning of Variables in Research?

Independent and Dependent Variables

❶Height, weight, shoe size, income, and test scores are quantitative variables.

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Intervening and Moderator Variables
Dependent and Independent Variables

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Extraneous variables are defined as any variable other than the independent and dependent variable. Control variables are variables that are kept the same in each trial. Lastly, the moderator variables are variables that increase or decrease the relationship between the independent and dependent variable.

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In scientific research, scientists, technicians and researchers utilize a variety of methods and variables when conducting their experiments.

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For instance, age can be considered a variable because age can take different values for different people or for the same person at different times. Similarly, country can be considered a variable because a person's country can be assigned a value. Variables aren't always 'quantitative' or numerical. The key to designing any experiment is to look at what research variables could affect the outcome. There are many types of variable but the most important, for the vast majority of research methods, are the independent and dependent variables.

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Dependent Variable The variable that depends on other factors that are measured. These variables are expected to change as a result of an experimental manipulation of the independent variable or variables. It is the presumed effect. Independent Variable The variable that is stable and unaffected by the other variables you are trying to measure. Intervening variables, like extraneous variables, can alter the results of our research. These variables, however, are much more difficult to control for. Intervening variables include motivation, tiredness, boredom, and any other factor that arises during the course of research.