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Customer Service (4430)

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❶Level 1 will suit you if you are new to customer service, and are looking to gain basic knowledge, understanding and experience of dealing with customers.

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Lecture Presenter
Belding Skills
Objectives

Then the student rolls the yarn to somebody else, holding on to the strand of yarn. Soon students have created a giant web. After everyone has spoken, you and all the students stand up, continuing to hold the yarn. Start a discussion of how this activity relates to the idea of teamwork -- for example, the students need to work together and not let others down. To drive home your point about teamwork, have one student drop his or her strand of yarn; that will demonstrate to students how the web weakens if the class isn't working together.

Questions might include the following: What is your name? Where were you born? How many brothers or sisters do you have?

What are their names? Do you have any pets? Tell students to write those questions on a piece of paper and to add to that paper five more questions they could ask someone they don't know.

Pair students, and have each student interview his or her partner and record the responses. Then have each student use the interview responses to write a "dictionary definition" of his or her partner to include in a Student Dictionary.

You might model this activity by creating a sample dictionary definition about yourself. Born in Riverside, California. No brothers or sisters. Have students bring in small pictures of themselves to paste next to their entries in the Student Dictionary. Bind the definitions into a book, and display it at back-to-school night. Ask each student to write a brief description of his or her physical characteristics on one index card and his or her name on the other.

Physical characteristics usually do not include clothing, but if you teach the primary grades, you might allow students to include clothing in their descriptions. Put all the physical characteristic index cards in a shoe box, mix them up, and distribute one card to each student, making sure that no student gets his or her own card.

Give students ten minutes to search for the person who fits the description on the card they hold. There is no talking during this activity, but students can walk around the room. At the end of the activity, tell students to write on the card the name of the student who best matches the description. Then have students share their results. How many students guessed correctly?

Patricia McHugh, John W. Set up a circle of chairs with one less chair than the number of students in the class. Play music as the students circle around the chairs. When the music stops, the students must sit in a seat. Unlike the traditional game, the person without a seat is not out. Instead, someone must make room for that person.

Then remove another seat and start the music again. The kids end up on one another's laps and sharing chairs! You can play this game outside, and you can end it whenever you wish. Afterward, stress the teamwork and cooperation the game took, and how students needed to accept one another to be successful.

Reinforce that idea by repeating this game throughout the year. Danielle Weston, Willard School, Sanford, Maine Hands-On Activity Have students begin this activity by listing at least 25 words that describe them and the things they like. No sentences allowed, just words! Then ask each student to use a dark pen to trace the pattern of his or her hand with the fingers spread apart.

Provide another sheet of paper that the student can place on top of the tracing. Because the tracing was done with a dark pen, the outline should be visible on the sheet below. Direct students to use the outlines as guides and to write their words around it.

Provide students a variety of different colored pencils or markers to use as they write. Then invite students to share their work with the class.

They might cut out the hand outlines and mount them on construction paper so you can display the hands for open house. Challenge each parent to identify his or her child's hand.

Then provide each student with five different-colored paper strips. Have each student write a different talent on separate paper strips, then create a mini paper chain with the strips by linking the five talents together.

As students complete their mini chains, use extra strips of paper to link the mini chains together to create one long class chain. Have students stand and hold the growing chain as you link the pieces together.

Once the entire chain is constructed and linked, lead a discussion about what the chain demonstrates -- for example, all the students have talents; all the students have things they do well; together, the students have many talents; if they work together, classmates can accomplish anything; the class is stronger when students work together than when individual students work on their own.

Hang the chain in the room as a constant reminder to students of the talents they possess and the benefits of teamwork. Your school librarian might have a discard pile you can draw from. Invite students to search through the magazines for pictures, words, or anything else that might be used to describe them.

Then use an overhead projector or another source of bright light to create a silhouette of each student's profile; have each student sit in front of the light source as you or another student traces the outline of the silhouette on a sheet of by inch paper taped to the wall.

Have students cut out their silhouettes, then fill them with a collage of pictures and words that express their identity. Then give each student an opportunity to share his or her silhouette with the group and talk about why he or she chose some of the elements in the collage.

Post the silhouettes to create a sense of "our homeroom. You can use such cards to gather other information too, such as school schedule, why the student signed up for the class, whether the student has a part-time job, and whether he or she has access to the Internet at home.

As a final bit of information, ask the student to write a headline that best describes him or her! This headline might be a quote, a familiar expression, or anything else. When students finish filling out the cards, give a little quiz. Then read aloud the headlines one at a time. Ask students to write the name of the person they think each headline best describes. Who got the highest score? It seems as if parents are contacted only if there is a problem with students.

At the end of each grading period, use the home address information to send a postcard to a handful of parents to inform them about how well their child is doing. This might take a little time, but it is greatly appreciated! Pop Quiz Ahead of time, write a series of getting-to-know-you questions on slips of paper -- one question to a slip. You can repeat some of the questions. Then fold up the slips, and tuck each slip inside a different balloon.

Blow up the balloons. Give each student a balloon, and let students take turns popping their balloons and answering the questions inside. Contributor Unknown Fact or Fib? This is a good activity for determining your students' note-taking abilities. Tell students that you are going to share some information about yourself. They'll learn about some of your background, hobbies, and interests from the second oral "biography" that you will present. Suggest that students take notes; as you speak, they should record what they think are the most important facts you share.

When you finish your presentation, tell students that you are going to tell five things about yourself. Four of your statements should tell things that are true and that were part of your presentation; one of the five statements is a total fib. This activity is most fun if some of the true facts are some of the most surprising things about you and if the "fib" sounds like something that could very well be true. Tell students they may refer to their notes to tell which statement is the fib.

Next, invite each student to create a biography and a list of five statements -- four facts and one fib -- about himself or herself.

Then provide each student a chance to present the second oral biography and to test the others' note-taking abilities by presenting his or her own "fact or fib quiz. Mitzi Geffen Circular Fact or Fib? Here's a variation on the previous activity: Organize students into two groups of equal size. One group forms a circle equally spaced around the perimeter of the classroom. There will be quite a bit of space between students. The other group of students forms a circle inside the first circle; each student faces one of the students in the first group.

Give the facing pairs of students two minutes to share their second oral "biographies. After each pair completes the activity, the students on the inside circle move clockwise to face the next student in the outer circle. Students in the outer circle remain stationary throughout the activity. When all students have had an opportunity to share their biographies with one another, ask students to take turns each sharing facts and fibs with the class.

Those in relative sales fields also have access to information on call handling, communication skills, customer care, how to handle difficult callers, enhancing quality and servicing callers.

These tools are free to use and there is no need to register. Customer Service Week takes place in the month of October, according to the website. During the week in October, they offer the free training course for employees in every type of organization.

This course helps customer service professionals increase customer loyalty and satisfaction within their companies. This web-based course includes audio and a PowerPoint presentation. The course only lasts 23 minutes, which makes it convenient for customer service associates. This website offers a variety of training tools for both advanced and beginning customer service representatives. It includes customer service training tools for CEOs and those in the health care industry.

Registration is required to use the tools on the website. Based in Massachusetts, Chanel Adams has been writing since Her work has been published by the "Lowell Sun," MadeMan. There are also key issues to address. In this day and age, many parents, students and other contacts will get in touch via websites or avenues like Facebook and Twitter to find out information or provide feedback that should be actioned.

If educational providers have a digital presence, they must keep up to date with such avenues if they want to provide solid customer service. In educational settings this is particularly important. Workers who are passionate about their job and the venue they work for; who can demonstrate patience, calm and optimism even at the most stressful or challenging times; and who genuinely like to interact with people, are always going to help deliver a more impressive customer service experience than employees who only have the requisite technical skills.

Test and Measure If you want to find out if the customer service provided at your facility is actually seen as positively as you hope, you should spend some time testing and measuring results in a variety of ways.

If you ask students, parents and other people involved in the school or university setting to evaluate the venue in different areas, you will be able to see what actually is working, and what still leaves a lot to be desired. Completing evaluations will help you to take your user experience to the next level much more quickly, and will stop you from simply hazarding a guess at what needs improvement or what is already top notch when it comes to customer service.

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Notify me when new comments are added. Get great discounts today! Get the secrets to CX success plus tips on how to deal with common roadblocks and how to use maturity modeling to know where to focus your attention. Customers expect an effortless, connected experience. Business leaders want to see a return from CX investments.

October 05, 2017

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Customer Service Lessons and Worksheets. Teach and learn basic customer service and related business principles. Here students learn an introduction to customer service and the various related terminology and vocabulary.

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Aiding Customer Service Teaching or Training. Aiding Customer Service Teaching or Training. Resources. Customer Services. 10 customer reviews. Author: Created by martincarter. Preview. This resource has been created for the new OCR Cambridge Nationals in Enterprise and Marketing. It is for Unit R - The exam unit/5(10).

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Customer Service is the part of a business’s activities that is concerned with meeting customer’s needs as fully as possible. The activities and tasks in this lesson resource will help students to apply their knowledge and understanding about 3/5(1). Free customer service resources dedicated to help small businesses delight their customers and build customer loyalty.

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Customer Service Training Games and Activities Five Free Customers Service Training Games. The following are five free customer service training games that we have used with clients during our customer service courses for more than a decade.. We frequently receive requests for training ideas from organizations wishing to develop their own customer service programs. Attn: Customer Service N. Fairway Drive Vernon Hills, IL Frequently Asked Questions. Find answers to your most frequently asked questions. Teacher Resources. Article Products. Enter 2 Win! Keyword Searches. Back to School eCatalog. Drop Items. Simple Technology. Intervention.